Edit this page
Modify this page
Edit this string
         
You are here: Home >Health >Articles >
Top 10 Tips for a stronger heart


Cardiovascular disease is 100% preventable. Below are some tips to help you on the right track.

1. Fill up on fiber. Not only does fiber help lower levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, it can aid weight management. Being overweight raises your risk of heart failure by a third while being obese doubles it. While two-thirds of Americans are too heavy, only half get enough fiber. Top sources include oats, beans, raspberries, blackberries, oranges and green peas.

2. Go Greens. 99 percent of women and 90 percent of men don’t get enough potassium in their diet. Responsible for regulating the fluid balance in our cells, potassium also blunts the effects of excess sodium. Too much sodium and too little potassium is a recipe for high blood pressure. Strike a healthier balance by cutting back on salt and increasing potassium intake with potatoes, broccoli, avocado, coconut water, kefir or yogurt, spinach, acorn squash, mushroom, and dried apricots.

3. Say “no” to coffee. Four or more cups of daily brew could elevate blood levels of homocysteine, an amino acid associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Drinking more than two cups of coffee a day can harden the arteries and contribute to arteriosclerosis. Instead of drinking coffee, switch to tea; its heart-healthy benefits include lower blood pressure and reduced inflammation.

4. “Beet” heart disease. Beets contain the antioxidant betanin, which can help keep LDL cholesterol from clogging your arteries, per a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Moreover, this root vegetable is a good source of folic acid, which helps to break down that heart-hurting homocysteine. Top sources of folic acid include spinach, citrus fruits, asparagus, lentils, avocados, okra, broccoli, romaine lettuce, and papaya.

5. Become a better listener. University of Baltimore researchers found that people with “dominant personalities” had a 47 percent higher risk of heart disease when compared to their more patient, passive peers. So how do you know if you’re “dominant”? Another study identified several markers – including the tendency to interrupt!

6. The “L” word your heart truly longs for: lycopene. This heart-healthy phytonutrient, found in tomatoes, watermelon, and pink grapefruit – may lower cholesterol levels and reduce inflammation. Harvard researchers found that eating seven or more servings of tomatoes a week might reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by 30 percent.

7. Choose healthy fats. Monounsaturated fats (think olive oil, avocado, nuts) help lower cholesterol. Another healthy fat – omega-3 – helps reduce inflammation. Omega-3 sources include walnuts and flaxseed.

8. Don’t turn breakfast into break-feast. While skipping breakfast may actually lower your metabolism, going overboard is no better. A new study done at the University at Buffalo found that big fatty breakfasts trigger the release of inflammatory chemicals associated with clogged arteries. So, skip the stack of flapjacks and opt for a strawberry-banana smoothie.

9. Go for a raise. In HDL cholesterol, that is. Higher levels of this “good” cholesterol can be almost as important as low levels of LDL cholesterol at keeping cardiovascular disease at bay. In addition to exercise, quitting smoking and limiting trans fats, a University of Scranton study found that drinking cranberry juice could help boost HDL levels as well consuming good quality fats such as eggs.

10. Most importantly, avoid all refined sugars like bread, donuts, pasta, pancakes, candy, among others. Sugar is well known to increase inflammation in the body, which may lead to an increased risk of developing heart disease.

 

yogaesoteric
June 25, 2017

 

Articles published recently

> 19 JulyIf You Eat French Fries or Potato Chips, This Will Stop You

> 19 JulyThe Vaccine Industry’s Biggest Threat? The Science of Wild Oregano Oil and the Diseases It Can Kill (2)

> 18 JulyUse of Oxytocin in Dairy Animals and Its Harmful Effects (2)

> 18 JulyThe Science of Energy Medicine: How to Work With Subtle Energy for Better Health (I)

> 17 JulyHope you enjoy the chemicals you eat

> 17 JulyHealth officials warn that cell phones cause brain cancer, headaches, low sperm count and impaired memory

> 17 JulyIs Autism a side effect of metal toxicity? High aluminum concentrations discovered in brain tissue of autistic children

> 16 JulyStudy Shows What Living In a ‘Greener’ Neighborhood Can Do For Your Health

> 16 JulyInternal Medicine Physician Shares What Happens To Your Body When You Stop Eating Meat

> 16 JulyNatural Approaches To Reversing Tooth Decay (1)

> 15 JulySacrificial virgins: HPV vaccine documentary reports lawsuits from Japan to Colombia increase worldwide

> 14 JulyUse of Oxytocin in Dairy Animals and Its Harmful Effects (1)

> 13 JulyCleaning Products As Damaging As Smoking 20 Cigarettes A Day

> 13 JulyThe Vaccine Industry’s Biggest Threat? The Science of Wild Oregano Oil and the Diseases It Can Kill (1)

> 12 JulyDo You Wake Up At The Same Time Every Night? According To Chinese Traditional Medicine, Here’s Why

> 11 JulyDengue vaccine does not protect against the disease but actually puts you at higher risk of contracting it

> 11 JulyMedical tyranny: Woman who rejected breast cancer diagnosis may still be forced undergo surgery without her consent

> 10 JulyIs natural gas contaminating your water? Multiple studies have detected harmful bacteria in Texas groundwater near extraction sites

> 9 JulyU.S. Government Funded Study Confirms Fluoride Harms Fetal Brain and Lowers IQ

> 8 JulyRamazzini Institute Rat Study Confirms National Toxicology Project Results: Cancers from Mobile Phone Frequencies

> 7 JulyHigh blood pressure is caused more by sugar consumption than salt intake

> 7 JulyStudy: Autism Epidemic Rife In Areas With Highest Vaccination Rates