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Studies

The Neuroscience of Imagination

Your brain loves to imagine to visualize ideas, find solutions to problems, and clarify your dreams. This creative and imaginative process responds to a number of fascinating neural mechanisms. The neuroscience of imagination tells us that there’s a creative genius within us all. In fact, when it comes to innovation and seeing new…
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Longevity: The Keys to Slow the Aging Process

Most people tend to look at the cycle of life as inevitable, and while it’s true that none of us can outrun Father Time, there are natural life extenders that can activate longevity pathways to slow the aging process. “Genes are not your destiny,” says Dr. David Sinclair, Ph.D., A.O., on the Dr. Axe show podcast. “… You can modify…
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Cellular ageing process reversed in historic first

Researchers in Israel claim to have partially reversed cellular aging using a somewhat controversial treatment. While only a small study, it improves our understanding of the aging process in humans. The shortening of telomeres, the caps at the end of each of our chromosomes, is one of the main underlying mechanisms behind aging.…
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Brain circuit for spirituality identified

More than 80 percent of people around the world consider themselves to be religious or spiritual. But research on the neuroscience of spirituality and religiosity has been sparse. Previous studies have used functional neuroimaging, in which an individual undergoes a brain scan while performing a task to see what areas of the brain light…
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How generosity shows up in the nervous system

New research explores how parenting and children's physiology may influence how much they share. Generosity not only feels good – to the giver and receiver – it has a host of other benefits for children, including promoting healthy friendships. But what makes kids generous, and how can parents help encourage them? A recent study…
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How spanking may affect brain development in children

Spanking may affect a child's brain development in similar ways to more severe forms of violence, according to a new study led by Harvard researchers. The research, published recently in the journal Child Development, builds on existing studies that show heightened activity in certain regions of the brains of children who experience…
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